Pet safety Articles - PawNation

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jarko_, Flickr By Dr. Marty Becker, via Vetstreet Winter and summer both present challenges to keeping pets safe and comfortable, but winter is actually easier to prepare for since it's more about preventing exposure and less about the summer problem of preventing accidents. With one major exception: In cold weather, you always need to be aware of the possibility that a chilly cat could be cuddled against the warm engine of a recently parked car or in the dryer on a pile of warm clothes. Always check your dryer before using it, and thump the hood of your car before starting it to send any sleeping cat on his way. With very few exceptions, my snow country neighbors would never...

cseeman, Flickr Holiday homes become pet playgrounds at this time of year. Cats delight in un-decking the halls and climbing the tree. Dogs eat decorations and baptize the tree. The result is a holiday that's anything but merry. Refer to these tips to keep your pets safe and your holiday happy. Plants and Pets. Dogs and especially puppies chew nearly anything. Cats rarely eat plants, but they do claw them and then lick/groom away the residue. Beware of holiday floral arrangements that contain pet dangers. Lilies can cause kidney failure. Holly and live mistletoe cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy if ingested by your pet. Poinsettias are not deadly but can cause nausea and/or...

dancuadra, Flickr Happy Halloween! Make it a safe one....

The author's dog wearing a simple and safe Halloween costume. Patti Lawson Halloween is around the corner, and people everywhere are looking forward to being scared (almost) to death and dressing up in silly and frightening costumes. The same is not true for dogs, however. The mischief and pranks for which the holiday is infamous present a myriad of potential safety challenges that can take dogs and their owners completely by surprise. If you want to include your dog in your Halloween celebration, make it an event that is safe and enjoyable for both of you. Here are some tips: 1. People love Halloween candy and so do dogs, but while candy is a great treat for us, dog owners need to make...

The author's dog, wearing her emergency vest. Patti Lawson Hurricane season is upon us once again, and all dog owners should have a disaster plan in place for their pets. I've never been through a hurricane with my dog, but I did experience a house fire with her, and it was horrific. I'd never even considered having a plan in place in case of a fire, let alone a hurricane or other natural disaster, but that night I vowed to never be without one again. If you are the victim of a natural disaster or a house fire and don't have a plan, you may not have a chance to escape without some tragedy. Get ready before disaster strikes. Pay attention to weather reports, and don't take chances with your...

bayasaa, Flickr Fireworks from July 4th celebration may be festive to you, but can turn your pets into nervous wrecks. More cats and dogs--and even livestock like horses--become lost on this day than any other when pets panic, go through windows, break tethers and leap fences. Even safely contained pets shiver, moan, and feel worse with each noisy boom. You may not see quivering scaredy cats, but the stress from noise phobia increases risk of hit-or-miss litter box behavior. It can take weeks or even months for desensitization and counter-conditioning techniques to teach fearful pets that noises won't hurt them. With Independence Day right around the corner, refer to these 10 tips for...