Cold weather Articles - PawNation

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Vicky Kasala / Getty It was a chilly fall, and winter could hit even harder in many parts of the country. Animal shelters and rescues across the United States are preparing for the sneaking cold. And they need your help. 1) Holiday Issues and Opportunities This time of year, animal shelters encounter two major problems: low funds and a need for fosters. "Shelters face many issues throughout the year, but one that is amplified during the holiday season is a lack of funds," says Kim Saunders, vice president of Shelter Outreach for Petfinder.com. "While many people are looking for gift-giving opportunities during the end of the year, shelters have historically received the lowest amount of c...

Philipp Guelland, AFP / Getty Images "Winter is actually a pretty good time for animals," says Dr. Jacob Cohen of Chicago's Animal Ark Veterinary Clinic. "They're out less -- which means less injuries and less illness." But there are still serious incidents of cold-weather-related health problems in pets that can and should be avoided, adds Cohen. 1. Space heaters. As with any electronic appliance, take care where you place these in your home. You want to prevent your pet from chewing cords. And either make sure your cat isn't tempted -- or able -- to jump on the heater, your cat or dog can't brush up against it, or that the temperature doesn't get too hot. Coming into contact with the he...

Corbis It's getting to be that time of year again. The temperatures are dropping and our dogs are getting friskier than they've been in months. Well, most of them are, anyway. There's always a princess or two who hates the cooler weather! One of the things we love about winter is watching happy hounds frolicking in the snow: it puts a smile on our faces that not even hot cocoa can match. If your dog loves playing in the snow and you have a great picture, be sure to submit it to the Paw Nation Flickr pool. We'll be pulling pictures of dogs in the snow for a fun winter gallery, and we'd love to feature your pup!...

Flickr/chazferret With temperatures dropping, staying inside is looking like a mighty good option. But it's hard to hole up in the house when you have a pooch that needs to go for a walk three times a day. While you can bundle up to face the freeze, your pet just has their coat to keep them warm. Which brings us to the age-old dilemma: Should I put clothes on my pet because it is cold? We chatted with veterinarian Dr. Jill A. Richardson -- an expert in pet safety, vice president of My Dog Walks, a consultant for the Veterinary Information Network and an instructor for the Penn Foster Vet Tech Program -- about her medical opinion on the pet-iquette for dressing doggies in the winter. Big d...