Climate change Articles - PawNation

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Moose are dying off all over North America, and no one seems to be able to pinpoint the reason or reasons. There have been steep population declines in New Hampshire, Minnesota, Montana and British Columbia, Canada. #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-695562{display:none;} .cke_show_borders #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-695562, #postcontentcontainer #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-695562{width:520px;height:383px;display:block;} One moose population in Minnesota, for example, has plummeted in 20 years from around 4,000 to fewer than 100, according to the New York Times. No one is sure what is causing the die-off, but scientists suspect many factors. Most of them center on climate change...

Kristen Seymour When you love animals as much as we do, you find yourself drawn to animal-related items in every walk of life, and that includes reading material. These are a few of the animal books that I've been recommending to friends. "100 Heartbeats: the Race to Save the Earth's Most Endangered Species," by Jeff Corwin We won't lie -- this isn't the easiest read you'll find, but then again, it's never easy to read about animals suffering the effects of climate change. However, Corwin is careful to not only write about the animals facing possible extinction, but also write about what's being done to help them. He includes success stories from years past to show that there is hope and...

Photo: jurek d./Flickr Ok, so there's a long list of doomsday situations brewing due to global warming, but did you know your pets are at a greater risk of catching an infectious disease due to milder temperatures? As the mercury rises, more and more infectious diseases are spreading via ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes. With winters becoming more mild, pest populations are increasing, turning into a major nuisance, to say the least. New Scientist reports that, "the European dog tick is transmitting a malaria-like disease, canine babesiosis, into countries where it was once rare including Belgium, Germany, Poland and the Netherlands. Meanwhile, lxodes ticks are living at greater...