Vision Articles - PawNation

Vision .

A new study has found that cats and dogs may be able to see in ultraviolet. Science already knew that birds, insects, reptiles and fish can all detect UV light. Now it seems that more animals share this ability than thought. Researchers hope that the new data will allow them to understand how animal vision influences what animals do. #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-759876{display:none;} .cke_show_borders #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-759876, #postcontentcontainer #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-759876{width:520px;height:383px;display:block;} Given their sleek ways, cats have long been a symbol of mysticism, and now the reputation gets a boost from new research that finds common house...

Photographs Show How Cats See

We tend to think of cats as having superior vision, due to their ability to see in the dark when we become lost like helpless babies. But while being a cat does come with visual advantages, so does being a human. One isn't better than the other; they're just different. Photographer Nickolay Lamm has produced a series of…

Flickr/J. Star Canine cataracts can be an upsetting and frightening diagnosis for any dog owner to face. Paw Nation spoke with Donna J. Spector -- a board-certified veterinary Internal Medicine specialist from VCA Animal Hospital -- to learn exactly what every dog owner should know about the ocular disease. What are dog cataracts? Cataracts are a dense opacity (cloudiness) in the lens of the eye. The normal lens is clear and transmits light onto the retina in the back of the eye. A cataract will block this transmission, leading to vision impairment or even full blindness. What are some signs that your dog might have cataracts? On examination, you may see a blue, gray or...

What Dogs and Cats Really See on TV ... and Elsewhere

Blu-ray, high-def, LCD. Does any of it make a difference to our pets when they're nestled on the couch watching television with us? Turns out quick-thinking cats may actually prefer high end flat screens. According to an Auckland, New Zealand veterinarian, pusses prefer watching prime time on fancy 100Hz LCD screens that have…