Teeth Articles - PawNation

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10 Best Dog Smiles to Celebrate Dental Health

Grab your toothbrush and get cleaning, pups — it's Pet Dental Health month! According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80 percent of dogs show signs of oral disease by the age of 3. Preventative oral care is totally necessary if you want to keep your canine's chops in mint condition. These 10 happy pups…

Just hanging around, chewing cud. A cow's life sounds pretty easy. But it's not all bovine bliss. A 1,000-pound cow swallows about 40 pounds of food a day, says the Daily Herald, and the average cow spends 15 hours a day chewing. The grass is only for starters. After swallowing, the cow's lunch begins to break down in the first of her four stomachs. Later, that food is regurgitated for still more chewing. All that chomping improves cattle digestion, but it takes a toll on a girl's pearly whites. By 8 years old or so, a cow's teeth are often so worn down that the animal can't eat properly. Without enough calories, mother cows can't provide enough milk for their young. Once a cow reaches th...

John Morton, Flickr Your vet has bombarded you with messages about the importance of maintaining your pet's oral hygiene, but you can't seem to get a toothbrush near the little furball's teeth without a struggle. So what you do when your cat or dog suddenly develops a case of lockjaw every time you appear with a toothbrush in your hand? Here are few ideas to help you get on track: 1. Start Slowly. "Get puppies and kittens used to having their mouths opened and work on rubbing their gums with your fingers," says Dr. Michael Farber, Practice Owner and Chief of Staff at West Chelsea Veterinary. "Do a little at a time and gradually build up to a soft brush." With older animals, "start with ju...

Flickr/This Year's Love Humans aren't the only mammals that need to brush their teeth to maintain their oral health. Dogs are at risk for developing many of the same oral diseases, such as plaque and tartar, that can develop in the human mouth as a result of neglected dental hygiene. Tartar causes gingivitis, an inflammation that hurts your dog's gums and eventually progresses to irreversible periodontal disease. At this stage, bacteria growth may be so rampant that it spreads beyond your dog's mouth and into his vital organs via the bloodstream, causing critical -- and often irreparable -- damage. However, the good news is that with a little home oral care provided by you, plaque build-u...