Senior Dogs Articles - PawNation

Senior Dogs .

Why Senior Pets Are the Best

Adopting a dog or cat is an exciting time for every member of the family - especially for the kids. While they may want to take home a puppy or kitten (who can resist those little faces?), there are a lot of excellent reasons to consider adopting a senior dog or cat. Here are just a few of the many reasons older pets are great for families. Credit: Getty Editorial They're a Well-Kept Secret "Compared to the huge undertaking it is to raise a youngster, I find that the pleasures and joys of an adult pet are so underrated," said Gail Buchwald, senior vice president of the ASPCA adoption center. "The best kept secret is getting a pet that's already an adult." Families with busy households...

A senior dog has different health requirements than a younger dog. Here are some tips to help you keep your senior pet healthy. Credit: Getty Creative 1. DON'T FORGET THE HEALTH CHECK-UPS Make sure your senior dog has regular visits with your veterinarian. In fact, many veterinarians recommend that senior dogs should be examined twice a year, even more so if the dog has serious health issues. A thorough physical examination by your veterinarian may reveal health issues that can impact your pet's life and comfort level, such as dental disease, arthritis, heart disease, kidney disease and more. RELATED: Vaccines and Your Puppy 2. NOTE ANY BEHAVIOR CHANGES IN YOUR DOG Watch your senior...

Marnie the Dog

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7 Common Ailments in Senior Dogs

As your dog ages be aware of any changes in behavior and mood. These can be indications that something is physically wrong. Just like people, as dogs grow older their ability to fend off illnesses declines. Even the most loving and attentive owner can miss signs by assuming that deviations in the dog's sleep or eating habits are normal, merely due to age. It is far better to err on the side of caution and contact your veterinarian when you have any doubts. To help, here is a list of common health problems commonly seen in aging dogs. Credit: Flickr/HPUPhotogStudent 1. Arthritis Cartilage between joints acts as a buffer to protect the bones from damage. When that cartilage is damaged it...

A senior dog has different health requirements than a younger dog. Here are some tips to help you keep your senior pet healthy. Credit: Getty Creative 1. DON'T FORGET THE HEALTH CHECK-UPS Make sure your senior dog has regular visits with your veterinarian. In fact, many veterinarians recommend that senior dogs should be examined twice a year, even more so if the dog has serious health issues. A thorough physical examination by your veterinarian may reveal health issues that can impact your pet's life and comfort level, such as dental disease, arthritis, heart disease, kidney disease and more. RELATED: Best Food for Pets With Cancer 2. NOTE ANY BEHAVIOR CHANGES IN YOUR DOG Watch your...

How Your Dog's Behavior Can Change With Age

Few people want to admit that their beloved puppy is approaching his twilight years. While it is possible for dogs to live into their 30s, like the Australian cattle dog Chilla who died at age 32, a more likely estimate of your canine’s life span ranges from almost 7 years to 13 ½. Here are some changes to expect as…