Senior Cats Articles - PawNation

Senior Cats .

Feline Hyperthyroidism

Feline hyperthyroidism is a commonly diagnosed disease, particularly in our senior cats. The disease results in excess levels of thyroid hormone being produced in the thyroid gland and circulated through the affected cat's blood stream. This excess thyroid hormone has a number of effects on your cat's body. Symptoms commonly seen in cats with hyperthyroidism include: –An increased appetite (sometimes described as a voracious appetite) –Weight loss (often despite an increase in appetite) –Increased thirst –Increase urination –Vomiting –Diarrhea –Restlessness/hyperactivity RELATED: Vaccination Programs for Puppies and Kittens Besides these symptoms, several other...

Defining Senior Age in Cats

While most of us like to remember our cats as the fluffy kittens we brought home at just a few months old, they don't stay young forever. The best way to help keep your cat as healthy as possible later in life is to recognize signs of aging and learn more about common ailments that can affect senior cats. What is a 'Senior Cat'? "Though many guidelines talk about seven years being equal to one human year, the size of the animal really depends on the extent to which you can follow that rule," said Dr. Heidi Lobprise, DVM, DAVDC and spokesperson for the International Veterinary Senior Care Society. In most cases, cats can be considered senior when they are between seven and ten years...

Living with an Arthritic Senior Cat

Living with a senior cat has rewards as well as challenges that are a bit different than those encountered when living with a younger cat. Pain is, of course, something we don't want to see in any of our pets. However, senior cats are more likely to develop conditions and illnesses that create pain and discomfort. Arthritis is a common but often unrecognized disorder in older cats. In one study, 90 percent of cats over 12 years of age showed radiographic (X-ray) evidence of arthritis. Unfortunately, recognizing arthritis in cats is challenging at best. Many of our cats hide their pain very effectively. While we may sometimes see our older cat limping or favoring one leg or another,...

I've written previously about cognitive dysfunction in dogs, and while we don't see cats suffering from this age-associated condition to the same degree, it is still common and severe enough to be worthy of our attention. Studies have shown that 28 percent of cats between the ages of 11 and 15 and 50 percent of cats over the age of 15 show some signs of cognitive dysfunction. The exact causes of declining mental function in older cats cannot always be identified. An increase in the breakdown rate of neurotransmitters and the build-up of damaging free radicals in the brain may be to blame in some cases. Whatever the cause, there are identifiable physical and physiological differences...

theqspeaks, Flickr When November rolls around each year we take time to celebrate the many blessings we've enjoyed. Pet people of course give thanks for their animal companions. This time of year, the holidays can prompt yearnings to adopt a new furry wonder. Nothing beats puppies and kittens for fun. But senior citizen pets offer many advantages. Remember that small dogs and cats often live into their mid- to late-teens or early twenties, while larger dogs remain happy and vital at least a decade. Old fogey pets often have lots of love to share, so think about it. November is Adopt A Senior Pet Month, so what better time to discuss the eight benefits of mature pets? 1. Less Initial...