Obesity Articles - PawNation

Obesity .

African elephants in captivity are packing on the pounds, and experts warn that the rise in obesity is contributing to infertility, which could be detrimental to the survival of the species in zoos. Credit: Getty Creative To get a handle on the problem, one group of researchers in Alabama is looking for a better way to measure body fat on the already huge animals. RELATED: Future Zoos: What Will They Look Like? Just like humans, elephants with excess fat are more likely to develop heart disease, arthritis and infertility, Daniella Chusyd, a graduate student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said in a statement. Previous studies have shown an alarming number of African elephants...

How Obesity Affects Your Pet's Lungs

As awareness of the pet obesity epidemic increases, more pet owners are familiar with disease conditions associated with the condition. Owners today more quickly understand the increased risk of diabetes, arthritis, and cancer posed by excess fat. Less known are the effects of excess fat on lung function. Credit: Getty Creative Research in humans has described lung changes and decreased lung function in obese patients. Similar research in pets has only recently begun. Although the research has not been able to explain the exact changes that impact lung function in animals, weight loss seems to have the same positive effect found in human patients. A recent study in the Journal of Veterina...

Obesity is the number one nutritional disease affecting pets today. Its relation to arthritis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and decreased life span make it a serious medical condition. Breed is a known risk factor in dogs and official breed descriptions may promote this obesity risk factor. Credit: Getty Creative Risk Factors for Obesity in Dogs Aging and sexual neutering have long been known to increase the risk of obesity in pets. Activity levels decrease as pets age. Arthritic changes associated with aging further decrease activity. Decreased activity levels reduce dietary calorie requirements. Without adjustments in meal portions, older animals easily put on extra fat. Sexual neut...

I didn't make it to the American Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Symposium this year, but I recently reviewed some of the research that was presented there. I want to share the results of one study that looked at the differences in body composition between indoor, neutered cats, and outdoor, intact cats. The researchers used something called dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to determine the percentage of the cats' bodies that were composed of fatty tissue versus lean tissue. The 16 indoor, neutered cats were typical pets with owners while the 21 outdoor, intact cats came from a trap-neuter-release program. All cats were between 1 and 6 years of age. RELATED: Top Ten Ways to Help Your Cat...

By Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience Do you own a portly pooch or a corpulent kitty? Unfortunately, the answer in the United States is all too likely to be yes. Nearly one in every four dogs and cats in the United States is overweight or obese, according to recent numbers tallied by the Banfield Pet Hospital. The problem is so pervasive that the Association for Pet Obesity has declared today (Oct. 9) National Pet Obesity Awareness Day. Banfield collects nationwide data on pet health through its 800 animal hospitals ...