Music Articles - PawNation

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Daft Punk's summer hit "Get Lucky" is such a catchy tune, it's even got Wagner the white German Shepherd dog howling along. Wagner starts chiming in at around 0:45, proving that canines can feel the beat, too. Watch out, Daft Punk. Wagner's clearly got skill and could potentially obtain his very own band, "Daft Pup." We'll have to stay tuned for that one....

Meet Bob Marley's cuddliest fan. This chill cat adores the singer so much, she was inspired to mix up his music. With a very paws-on approach, this feline manages to give Marley's jams new life. But in the end, it is the music that takes control, leaving this kitty spinning like a record. Hey DJ Kitty, can you play "Three Little Birds" next? IF YOU LIKE BOB MARLEY CAT, YOU'LL LOVE WILLIE NELSON'S FURRY FANS:...

The Original Singing-Dog Video

Dog videos are an evolving art form, and we have reached a point where clips of pooches singing are truly hitting their stride. There are canines covering pop hits and pups accompanying themselves on the piano, but where did it all start? As with trends, singing-dog videos had a humble beginning. Check out this sweet and simple 1932 short, "Just a Singer." Now we'll let this bellowing Boston Terrier show you the rest. See More Musical Animals:...

The World's Most Musical Animals

It's official: we're in the midst of a summer heat wave. A great way to distract yourself from the thermostat is to catch one of the season's music festivals or concerts. Or you could enjoy an animal jam session instead! Check out some of the most musically-inclined creatures we know. CATCERTO  Nora may have a…

Hamster Jazz Band Jams Out

Hamsters have more hobbies then spinning. Off the exercise wheel, these critters have an expansive repertoire of talents. One of their more adorable endeavors is jazz music. These furry friends sure know how to lay down a happening groove. Take a listen to their sweet, squeaky song right here....

Sydney's Royal Botanical Gardens are using industrial music and banging noises to fend off fruit bats. While about 5,000 bats had been routinely seen hanging from trees in the park, only about ten now remain, says Agence France-Presse. The executive director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Brett Summerell, says that 45 minutes of "annoying sounds" in the morning and 35 in the evening have been enough to scare away the bats. Also known as flying foxes, the bats have, say the Botanical Parks, damaged several hundred trees and plants, resulting in the loss of more than 28 trees and 30 palms. The introduction of industrial music - of heavy-duty noise - has led to "peace and quiet" in the park...