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According to MNN, a new treatment may have been discovered that can take the sting out of the box jellyfish's deadly poison. The study found that a zinc-based compound was able to prevent death in mice that was injected with the jellyfish's venom. If the compound is found to work in larger animals, it could one day be used in humans. A topical version of the zinc-compound has already been tested. It was used to reduce the pain of a jellyfish sting Diana Nyad received in August when she swam 103 miles between Florida and Cuba. Box jel...

The "Benjamin Button" of Invertebrates: Meet the Immortal Jellyfish

According to National Geographic, a recent study states that a possible "immortal" jellyfish species that can age backwards, like Brad Pitt's character "Benjamin Button," is invading the oceans in swarms. …

Giant Black Jellyfish on the Rise in San Diego

Black jellyfish, discovered in 1999, are still relatively new to the known animal world, but that hasn't stopped them from popping up all over the place. According to KPBS, the sea creature have been surprising swimmers, appearing on the shores of San Diego. Scientist say this is a sign that something is going on with the…

A video of a truly bizarre-looking sea creature had scientists and viewers mystified, and some screaming "sea monster!" According to the (U.K.) Daily Telegraph, researchers have confirmed that this underwater anomaly is deepstaria enigmatica, a type of jellyfish. Deepstaria enigmatica sightings are extremely rare, as the creature was first discovered only in 1967. Before researchers made their announcements, theories abounded about what it could be. Ideas ranged from whale placenta to a garbage bag to the Lovecraftian monster Cthulhu. The video above was captured by a camera belonging to deep-sea drillers. See more sea monsters:...

Photo: Deni_Jones/Flickr One of these things is not like the other: jellyfish, booze, and a pocketknife. Okay, so maybe none of them are like the other, but for 41-year-old Keith Edward Marriott, grouping them together seemed like a good idea. According to the St. Petersburg Times, Marriott, who had reportedly been drinking since 9 AM, was pretending to drown beachside before he began throwing jellyfish at nearby teenagers. And while we agree that the combination of sea creatures and booze is a surefire way to take out one's aggression on pesky young'uns, it didn't bode well for Marriot who was later revealed to be carrying a pocketknife in his shorts -- no, we're not being cheeky...