Expert Articles - PawNation

Expert .

Are Dogs Capable of Love?

People love to talk about how much they love their dogs and often mention that one special individual to whom no others can really compare. I wonder, are the dogs in our lives capable of these same types of feelings? Credit: Getty Creative One of the problems with exploring the idea of love is the all encompassing nature of the word in the English language. We can love our mates, our children, our pets, or even a favorite desert; but these are all actually very different emotions. No one ever talks about how they'd jump in front of a speeding truck to save a piece of chocolate cake, after all! Other languages have different words for different types of love, but in everyday English we're...

Does your sleeping space also function as a bed for your canine or feline companion? Is your dog or cat habitually waking you up in the morning with a purposeful gnaw or paw at your face? If so, you are one of many owners having such habitual relationships with their pets. Yet, are these pet behaviors appropriate and could they even lead to health problems among human caretakers? Credit: Thinkstock The topic recently was brought to my attention after reading two Huffington Post articles, Cat Alarm Clocks' Are The Best Alarm Clocks and Dog Alarm Clocks Are Actually The Best Alarm Clocks, each claiming that cats or dogs make for a better alarm clock. The articles include videos featuring...

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is the most common heart disease diagnosed in cats. It is a disease that affects the heart muscle, causing the muscle to become thickened and ineffective in pumping the blood through the heart and the rest of the body. Credit: Thinkstock Cats suffering from cardiomyopathy are most often middle-aged to older cats. However, it is not impossible to see the disease in younger cats as well. It affects both males and females. Though any cat can develop HCM, some breeds are known to have a genetic predisposition to the disease. Currently, there are genetic tests that can detect the gene mutation responsible for HCM in Maine Coons and Ragdolls. RELATED: Cats,...

Cats, Birds and Other Wildlife

A recent study published in the journal Nature Communications looked at the impact of free-ranging cats on wildlife in the United States and concluded that "free-ranging domestic cats kill 1.4–3.7 billion birds and 6.9–20.7 billion mammals annually. Un-owned cats, as opposed to owned pets, cause the majority of this mortality. Our findings suggest that free-ranging cats cause substantially greater wildlife mortality than previously thought and are likely the single greatest source of anthropogenic mortality for U.S. birds and mammals. Scientifically sound conservation and policy intervention is needed to reduce this impact." Credit: Thinkstock This study has led to numerous media...