Evolution Articles - PawNation

Evolution .

New DNA evidence suggests that dogs were first domesticated in Europe between 19,000 and 32,000 years ago, according to the Associated Press. #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-532174{display:none;} .cke_show_borders #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-532174, #postcontentcontainer #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-532174{width:520px;height:383px;display:block;} ‚ÄčThe new research is based on DNA taken from the fossils of 18 ancient animals related to dogs and wolves. The fossils were found in Argentina, Belgium, Germany, Russia, Switzerland and the United States. When compared to DNA from modern dogs and wolves, similarities between the ancient animals and the modern canines were revealed....

Are Dogs Smarter Than Cats?

Dog lovers and cat lovers may never stop arguing over the relative merits of their respective favorite pets, and one of the most hotly contested questions continues to be the debate over who's smarter: dogs or cats? A recent Wall Street Journal essay has dredged up the old argument once again. The essay decidedly favors dogs when it comes to comparing their intelligence to cats, and canines seem to have science backing up their argument. Traditionally, the cat's curiosity and sly independence have been considered by many to ...

"You wouldn't laugh so hard if you knew who my great-great-great-great-great-great-uncle was!" ebnt-photo, Flickr What do chickens have in common with that terrible lizard, Tyrannosaurus rex? Very little, you might think. You wouldn't keep a bunch of T-rexes in a coop in your backyard even if you could, and when was the last time you ran screaming in terror from an approaching Rhode Island Red? Yet genetic connections show that our favorite fowl are a lot more similar to those prehistoric predators than we might realize. The Huffington Post put together a gallery showing this and several other unexpected evolutions that closely link seemingly unrelated species. Wanna know what you have in ...

"Finger, yum!. Wait, are you pointing at something?" Photo: CJ Sorg/Flickr If your dog stares at the end of your outstretched finger rather than directing her focus on where you're pointing, her breed may be to blame. A Hungarian scientist found that dogs bred to work in visual contact with humans, such as pointers, retrievers and sheep dogs, were quick to understand the meaning of a human's pointing finger, reports Science Daily. Hunting hounds, livestock guard dogs, pups used for underground hunting, and sled dogs weren't so hot at the finger-pointing test. Why is this? Dogs were domesticated more than 10,000 years ago, and have been living and working with people ever since. During t...