Endangered Articles - PawNation

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BANGKOK - Thailand's "out of control" ivory market is driving Africa's elephant poaching crisis, conservationists warned Wednesday, accusing the kingdom of backsliding on its pledges. Credit: Associated Press The number of ivory products on sale in Bangkok nearly trebled from 5,865 in January last year to 14,512 in May 2014, according to the wildlife group TRAFFIC. The Southeast Asian nation, a known hub for the illegal trade in tusks from Africa, has come under pressure to ban the sale of ivory from domestic elephants. This legal trade is blamed for easing the smuggling of ivory into Thailand from other countries, most of which is made into ornaments or taken to China and Vietnam where...

A major oil and gas company has pledged to stop plumbing for oil in Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, after the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and United States authorities pressured the firm to halt operations in the region. Credit: Getty Editorial Soco International Inc., an oil and gas production company headquartered in London, has agreed to cease development work in the area within 30 days, according to company representatives. RELATED: Primates at Risk The African park - the oldest national park on the continent - is a UNESCO World Heritage site, and is home to a diverse array of animals, including hippopotamuses, "critically endangered" mountain gorillas...

Gertjie, a 4-month-old rescued rhino, refuses to spend his nights alone since he watched poachers attack and kill his mother in May. The orphaned calf was found crying inconsolably next to his mother's mutilated body in South Africa. Poachers attacked Gertjie's mother at the Kapama Private Game Reserve in South Africa, and took her horn. Leaving her to die, the poachers fled before rangers arrived on the scene. Gertjie could not be calmed, and the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre (HESC) was called in for help. "It was a devastating sight, as the tiny animal would not leave her side, and was crying inconsolably for her," the HESC said in a blog post. Gertjie was brought to the HESC,...

A clever frog uses manmade storm drains as a microphone, blasting his mating calls over long distances, a new study finds. Meintein tree frog. Credit: Flickr/pseudolapiz Male mientien tree frogs (Kurixalus diootocus) have figured out that city storm drains amplify their mating calls, according to the paper, published in the latest issue of the Journal of Zoology. The louder and longer the calls are, the greater the chances are that the male will find an available mate. "Structures, such as wall surfaces, may change the acoustic environment for signals transmitted by animals," wrote study authors Wen-Hao Tan and colleagues, "creating novel environments that animals must either adapt to or...