Discovery Articles - Page 2 - PawNation

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The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archaeologists in England. Credit: Getty Editorial "They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick Daffern, a senior project manager with Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. "It is lovely to imagine some irate person chasing a dog or some other animal away from their freshly made tiles." The artifacts, which could be nearly 2,000 years old, were found in the Blackfriars area of Leicester, the English city where the long-lost bones of King Richard III were discovered under a parking lot in 2012. Wardell...

Why Zebras Have Stripes

PARIS - Zebras have stripes to deter the tsetse and other blood-sucking flies, according to a fresh bid to settle a debate that has raged among biologists for over 140 years. Credit: Thinkstock Since the 1870s, in a dispute sparked by the founders of evolutionary theory Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, scientists have squabbled over how the zebra got its trademark look. Are its stripes for camouflage, protecting the zebra with a "motion dazzle confusion effect" against hyenas, lions and other predators in the savannah? Do the stripes radiate heat to keep the zebra cool? Or do they have a social role -- for group identity, perhaps, or mating? But a new study, published in the...

Meet the "Chicken from Hell," a recently identified bird-like dinosaur that roamed the Dakotas with T. rex 66 million years ago. Credit: Associated Press The beaked dinosaur, Anzu wyliei, is described in the latest issue of the journal PLoS ONE. The dino was tall, measured 11.5 feet long, weighed 500 pounds and had very sharp claws. RELATED: Dinosaur Feathers Found in Amber "It was a giant raptor, but with a chicken-like head and presumably feathers," co-author Emma Schachner of the University of Utah, said in a press release. "The animal stood about 10 feet tall, so it would be scary as well as absurd to encounter." Lead author Matt Lamanna of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History...

T. Rex Had a Small, Cute Cousin

Toothy Tyrannosaurus rex had a tiny cousin, suggests new research. The dwarf dino, named Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, lived 70 million years ago in Alaska, according to a new study, published in the journal PLOS ONE. Tyrannosaurus rex bones on display at the Perot Museum. Credit: AP The skull for the newly identified dinosaur measured 25 inches long, compared to 60 inches for T. rex. The new dino was a tyrannosaur though, conclude researchers Anthony Fiorillo and Ronald S. Tykoski from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science and their colleagues. RELATED: Could These 10 Animals Be Resurrected? Tyrannosaurs marched around on two legs, loved meat and had a large skull relative to the size of...

A new dinosaur from Portugal is Europe's largest-ever terrestrial predator and was the biggest carnivorous dinosaur of the Jurassic Period, according to paleontologists who studied its remains. Credit: Getty Creative The dinosaur, named Torvosaurus gurneyi, measured close to 33 feet long and weighed over 2,200 pounds, according to a paper in the latest PLoS ONE. The predator was at the top of Europe's terrestrial food chain roughly 150 million years ago. RELATED: Oldest Dinosaur Nursery Found "The fauna of what is now Portugal was extremely diverse in the Late Jurassic," paleontologist Octavio Mateus of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa, and co-author of the study, said in a press release....

Texas A&M University researchers have discovered a physics formula that explains all animal movement. The formula applies to insects, birds, fish, mammals and everything between. #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-396601{display:none;} .cke_show_borders #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-396601, #postcontentcontainer #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-396601{width:520px;height:383px;display:block;} Despite the various shapes and components of animals' bodies, they all move in essentially the same way. "We found insects, birds, bats, whales, fish, dolphins, even smaller mollusks are all using the same basic mechanics," said marine biologist Nathan Johnson. Researchers hope this discovery will...