Badgers Articles - PawNation

Badgers .

LONDON - Britain's Princess Anne said gassing badgers was a "much nicer" way to cull them rather than shooting them, in an interview to be aired Sunday. Credit: Flickr Queen Elizabeth II's daughter discussed the recent pilot badger culls -- which took place in Gloucestershire, southwest England, where she lives and farms -- aimed at curbing the spread of tuberculosis in cattle. An independent report on the pilots found the level of culling needed to bring about a reduction in bovine TB had not been achieved by the shooting of free-running badgers. Anne, 63, told BBC television that "most of the people who did it in the past will tell you that gas is a much nicer way of doing it, if that'...

The temporary reprieve on badger culls in England was indeed only temporary. UK Environment Secretary Owen Patterson has announced that pilot badger culls in the western counties of Somerset and Gloucestershire, which will see the killing of 70 percent of the badgers in each area, will go ahead this summer after all, and that a third one, in the county of Dorset, will be prepared as a reserve. This news is terribly sad. I grew up in the west of England, and badgers are a natural and delightful part of the environment. Farmers will be allowed to shoot up to 5,094 badgers in West Gloucestershire and West Somerset over a four-year period as a result of this cull. Let's at least hope that the...

Oh, bother - it looks like England has a peculiar pest problem! According to Digital Spy, a recent road collapse in Leicestershire is being blamed on badgers. Officials say the animals repeatedly tunneled under the road, causing its support to weaken. Eventually, this lack of stability caused two large craters to form in the road. The road is now closed off to all cars while it is being repaired. Crews estimate the damage will take about three weeks to fix. Workers are trying to reopen the road as soon as possible, but ar...

This image from the Daily Squee doesn't just make us smile; it also draws on nostalgia for the British anthropomorphic literature of our youths. Maybe it's because despite being unassailably cute, Mr. Badger and Mr. Fox appear to be engaged in sober conference. What serious business might they be discussing? Having grown up reading "The Wind in the Willows," "The Animals of Farthing Wood," and "Redwall," we imagine that some drama is going down in the forest. Some adorable drama. Share...