Cat Nutrition - PawNation

Cat Nutrition.

When I discuss the possibility that a cat might be suffering from a food allergy, owners will often say "that's not possible, I changed his food and he didn't get any better." This has no effect on my tentative diagnosis for a couple of reasons: Credit: Thinkstock 1. The chance that the food change removed the ingredients most commonly associated with food allergies is slim. 2. Even if the ingredient list looks appropriate, over the counter foods are often mislabeled. The most common ingredients associated with food allergies in cats are, in descending order: 1. beef 2. dairy products 3. fish 4. lamb 5. wheat 6. chicken 7. corn gluten/corn 8. egg Cats can be allergic to one or more of t...

Chronic diarrhea is an all too common problem for cats and their owners. In a perfect world, veterinarians would always be able to fully work up the case, come to a definitive diagnosis, and prescribe treatment that cures the diarrhea. But as we all know, this is not a perfect world. Credit: Moyan Brenn / Flickr Financial considerations or other health problems may prevent a complete work up. Sometimes, a diagnosis remains elusive despite running "every" test, or the diarrhea may not fully resolve even with appropriate treatment. Whatever the reason, it's not unusual for veterinarians and owners to find themselves searching for "something" that will firm up a cat's stools. RELATED: 5 Tips...

Cat Nutrition Myths Debunked

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5 Tips for Picking Out Treats for Cats

My cat has me well trained. Every evening she arrives in the kitchen for her treats. If I don't conjure them up quickly enough, she is not shy in expressing her irritation – vocally at first and then as the situation becomes more urgent (from her point of view) by placing all of her six pounds directly underfoot. I invariably acquiesce at this point to save one or both of us from injury. Credit: Thinkstock Since treats are a daily indulgence for many cats, it's important to put some thought into what makes a good cat treat. 1. Treats should be treats In my mind, a treat should be special... something that a cat looks forward to and relishes eating. I've heard nutritionists and veterinari...

A couple of weeks ago we talked about how, unlike many other species, cats need more protein when they enter their golden years (around 12 years of age). In the process of researching that article I came across some disturbing information. The recommendations for minimum protein levels in cat food put forth by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) and the National Research Council (NRC) may be too low. Credit: Getty The NRC's recommended allowance for protein in adult cat food is 50 g/1,000 kcal metabolizable energy (ME). For kittens, it is 56.3 g/1,000 kcal ME. Now don't go looking for these sorts of numbers on cat food labels, they're not there. What does appear on t...

Senior Cats Need More Calories

Anybody out there have an old, skinny cat? Veterinarians see them on a daily basis. Sometimes we reach a causative diagnosis - kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders are all common culprits. At other times, however, a cat may lose weight but appear to be normal in all other regards. What's going on in these cases? Credit: Shutterstock Of course it's always possible that a health work-up missed something. For example, a cancer may be too small to find, GI disease will often go undiagnosed without biopsies, or kidney function may be declining but not yet reached the point where blood work and/or a urinalysis are abnormal. Putting those issu...