Cat Health - Page 2 - PawNation

It's summertime and the living isn't always easy for cats. Summer is the time for sun, fun, vacations and outdoor activities from gardening, sports, picnics, BBQs, vacations to beach days. School is out: families spend more time together but often spend less time with their cats. While humans are enjoying more outdoor fun, cats being creatures of habit, miss their humans and their usual routine. Credit: Petfinder Behavioral issues are more likely to crop up when routines are changed. Anxiety, separation anxiety and varieties of aggression can result. More animals roam in the summer from neighborhood pets to wildlife. This is the most likely time for incidents of direct aggression and...

Ear Infections are one of the most common canine and feline health problems, but that doesn't mean that veterinarians and owners are all that good at treating them. We all have to share the blame in this regard. Credit: Thinkstock Owners often want a quick (and inexpensive) fix, and doctors can be unwilling to put in the time necessary to thoroughly explain the complexities behind many ear infections. To help remedy this situation, here are a few tips for treating ear infections in dogs and cats. 1. Ear infections typically develop as a result of another problem. In most cases, a pet's ear infection should be viewed as a symptom of another, underlying condition. Allergies to ingredients...

There seem to be a lot of questions and misconceptions about parasites and cats. I'd like to take this opportunity to point out what these parasites can do to your cat and why you should worry about them. Credit: Thinkstock Cats and Fleas Fleas are one of the most common parasites we find on cats. Here's what you need to know about them. –Fleas survive on a blood diet. Because these parasites ingest your cat's blood, anemia is a potential complication. –Some cats develop an allergy to the bite of the flea. Flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) is one of the most common allergies diagnosed in cats. Because the allergy is a reaction to a substance in the flea's saliva, it takes only one flea...

As reported by this media story, a potentially deadly virus reached the island of Maui late last month. That virus is the feline panleukopenia virus. Credit: pavelgr / Shutterstock With the virus receiving this type of attention in Hawaii, you may be wondering whether your cat is at risk, even if you don't live on Maui. The answer to that question is, possibly, yes. This is especially true if your pet is a kitten or a young cat. Feline panleukopenia is sometimes known as feline distemper, although this name is somewhat of a misnomer. The virus itself is actually a parvovirus. In fact, years ago, when parvovirus was first recognized in dogs, and before dedicated canine parvovirus vaccines...