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African elephants in captivity are packing on the pounds, and experts warn that the rise in obesity is contributing to infertility, which could be detrimental to the survival of the species in zoos. Credit: Getty Creative To get a handle on the problem, one group of researchers in Alabama is looking for a better way to measure body fat on the already huge animals. RELATED: Future Zoos: What Will They Look Like? Just like humans, elephants with excess fat are more likely to develop heart disease, arthritis and infertility, Daniella Chusyd, a graduate student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said in a statement. Previous studies have shown an alarming number of African elephants...

If you're trying to help the bees by planting vegetables and flowers in your garden, you may actually be doing more harm than good, according to a report released today by Friends of Earth, an international network of environmental organizations. Credit: Getty Creative That's because at least half of plants in the report bought at big home improvement stores were found to contain neonicotinoids, a class of pesticides that has been proven to be harmful, and sometimes fatal, to bees. In fact, some scientist believe that the pesticides' effects on bees is a warning sign that the chemicals may also pose health issues for people. RELATED: Faces of Bees, Flies and Friends The Friends of Earth...

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Polar bears appear to be genetically superior to humans when it comes to warding off heart disease, a new study on the hefty bears finds. What's remarkable is that polar bears are among the most fat-obsessed beasts in the animal kingdom. Credit: Flickr/rubyblossom. "The life of a polar bear revolves around fat," according to Eline Lorenzen of UC Berkeley who worked on the study. It's published in the latest issue of the journal Cell. RELATED: Animal Olympians: Photos "Nursing cubs rely on milk that can be up to 30 percent fat and adults eat primarily blubber of marine mammal prey," Lorenzen explained. "Polar bears have large fat deposits under their skin and, because they essentially...